Thump In The Morning

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The first day of school can be very exciting yet overwhelming for some students as well as parents. especially those that are going to a new school this year. The thought of meeting new friends, trying to find classes and getting familiar with the campus can be a challenge.  If you’re a mom who’s experiencing a little extra stress at the beginning of a new school year, you’re not alone. In fact, your feeling is more common than you may think, especially if your kids are younger.

A new survey from Kiddie Academy, an educational child care center, found that when all members of the family are polled, 63 percent say it’s mom who has the hardest time with the first day of school. That’s compared to only 27 percent who identified the child as being the one who struggles most. It’s normal for parents to have a tough time transitioning themselves when their kids begin kindergarten, For a lot of families, this is the first time experiencing losing some control.

Parents aren’t the only ones who can experience increased anxiety over the start of new school year. Kids often feel it, too, and parents can play an integral role in helping them cope. Anything you can do to minimize the mystery of it all ahead of time is going to help your kids. If you can preplan to have a visit to the school, talking about everything they should expect, and even practicing what the first day of school might look like, that can help.

When the first day does finally roll around, it’s not uncommon for younger kids to cling and struggle a little.  For parents who are already anxious about how their child may handle this transition, they may be tempted to prolong their goodbye. And that just might make things worst.

  • Feeling Anxiety

    First, if your child is feeling anxious about the first day, try to do some test runs. visiting the school ahead of time can help your child find their classroom or practice getting out of the car at the drop-off point. Any opportunity for exposure and repetition can help with confidence.

  • Organization

    Organization gives them a sense of confidence, of calm, when their emotions are all over the place they know that they have a set place that when they’re ready to go in the classroom.

  • Communication

    Social-emotional learning, or SEL, is a popular topic among educators today and is being integrated into the curriculum in many school districts. SEL refers to the ways in which children build healthy relationships with themselves and with others.  This framework of self-awareness can begin at home. When discussing back to school, you might gauge your child’s thoughts about the classroom. Ask them what they are looking forward to and what they are interested in learning, along with any concerns they might have. (Some children might have worries about being bullied. Be open and assure them that school is a safe place.

  • Validation

    Validate your child at home, therefore they aren’t looking for it outside the home. Let them know how smart and beautiful they are so they enter school with confidence.

  • Go School Shopping

    Designating items as “back to school,” like an outfit or backpack, makes preparing for the school year a ritual and can stoke excitement.  You and your child can pick out new books during this time as well  and the titles don’t necessarily have to be about school. Refreshing their library at the start of each school year can be an annual tradition with the intention of starting anew and resetting your child’s mindset.